Descriptions of Required Courses

Descriptions of Required Courses

Last updated: July 14th, 2022 at 10:16 am

MDF 6001 MOLECULES TO MEDICINE AND MUSCULOSKELETAL

During this course students engage in various modalities of active learning to begin to master medical terminology, develop team- work skills, explore digital anatomy, and establish relationship with peers and academic mentors. The course is designed to provide students with a broad foundation in critical biomedical science subject areas, including biochemistry, cell biology, molecular biology, genetics/genomics, microbiology, immunology, pharmacology, physiology, anatomy, embryology, and histology. Course content focuses on the following learning objectives:

1. Using correct medical-anatomic terminology, describe the anatomy of the back and spinal cord; upper and lower extremities; thoracic cavity, lungs, mediastinum, heart, and great vessels; abdominal wall and abdominal viscera and vessels; head and neck. (MK1)

2. Apply knowledge of the anatomy and physiology of the musculoskeletal system to explain clinical signs and symptoms arising from disease or injury. (MK1, MK2, MK3)

3. Understand the principles of basic and clinical sciences related to the structure and function of the musculoskeletal system including common related pathophysiology. (MK1, MK2)

4. Describe the arterial supply, venous and lymphatic drainage, and innervation of the major organ systems. (MK1)

5. Discuss the basic structure/function relationships that underlie the physical examination of a patient. (MK1)

6. Describe the structure and function of basic tissue components (including epithelial cells, connective tissue cells, muscle cells, nerve cells, blood cells, and extracellular matrix). (MK1)

7. Describe the architecture of a cell as it relates to cell function. (MK1)

8. Describe embryogenesis, including the role of programmed gene expression, developmental regulation of gene expression, and the order of tissue differentiation and morphogenesis. (MK1)

9. Describe the structural features of DNA, RNA, and chromosomes and the methods used to analyze these structures. (MK1)

10. Explain the processes through which a polypeptide chain folds to its active native structure, the interactions that stabilize that structure, and the role of post- translational modifications. (MK1)

11. Summarize and compare the major metabolic pathways for anabolism and catabolism of amino acids, carbohydrates, lipids, and nucleotides including regulatory mechanisms. (MK1)

12. Develop a systematic approach to the study of pharmacology, including pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, indications and contraindications, drug- drug interactions, and most common adverse effects of drugs. (MK1, MK4)

13. Describe the basis of microbial classification, structure and function of viruses, bacteria, fungi, and parasites. (MK2)

14. Describe the reproductive cycles of RNA and DNA viruses, the molecular basis of viral pathogenesis, and the characteristics of latent and persistent viral infections. (MK2)

15. Explain the general principles of antimicrobial stewardship. (MK4, MK6, MK7, SBP5)

16. Compare the structure and function of the immune system cells, including granulocytes, natural killer cells, macrophages, T-lymphocytes, and B- lymphocytes. (MK2)

17.Compare the acute inflammatory response to the chronic inflammatory response, including mediator systems, the vascular response to injury, inflammatory cell recruitment, and clinical manifestations. (MK2, MK3)

18. Explain the causes, fundamental characteristics, and process of carcinogenesis, and describe the most common biochemical and physiological alterations found in malignant transformation. (MK2, MK3)

19. Identify and infer the pathophysiological processes in abnormal organ systems. (MK3)

20. Demonstrate the ability to independently search the literature, assess the quality of resources, and apply evidence-based principles to clinical decision making. (MK5, PBLI2, PBLI3)

21. Demonstrate ability to synthesize information from multiple sources and provide concise presentations. (PBLI2, PBLI3, ICS5)

22. Develop the ability to work effectively as part of a team, to develop effective communication, leadership, life-long learning, and problem-solving skills in a small group setting and become skilled at self-assessment as well as assessing the performance of peers and faculty. (PBLI1, ICS1, ICS5, P2)

23. In the context of ethical principles, social justice, and optimum patient-centered care, define, describe, and recognize issues related to diversity, equity, and inclusion relevant to population health and disease processes presented in this course. (SBP1, SBP3, ICS2, ICS3, P1, P2)

MDC 6011 PATIENT CENTERED CARE 1

During this course students engage in various modalities of active learning and begin to encounter their first patient, learn how to take a patient history, propose likely diagnoses, and begin to recognize anatomical landmarks on routine radiographic imaging as well as begin to correlate pathologic findings. Course content focuses on the following learning objectives:

1. Conduct a hypothesis driven adult and geriatric medical history (PCPS1, PCPS2)

2. Perform a hypothesis driven physical examination with emphasis on correct techniques and normal findings and articulate expected and actual normal and abnormal findings in an accurate manner. (PCPS1, PCPS2)

3. Propose the most likely diagnosis from two or more given diagnoses, based on history and physical exam (PCPS3)

4. Begin to formulate an unranked problem list based on history and physical exam (PCPS2)

5. Predict the most likely clinical findings based on given differential diagnoses. (MK2, PCPS4)

6. Be able to recognize anatomical landmarks on routine radiographic imaging as well as begin to correlate pathologic findings. (PCPS4)

7. In the context of ethical principles, social justice, and optimum patient-centered care, define, describe, and recognize issues related to diversity, equity, and inclusion relevant to population health and disease processes presented in this course. (SBP1, SBP3, ICS2, ICS3, P1, P2)

MDF 6002 CARDIOVASCULAR, RESPIRATORY AND RENAL

During this course students continue to engage in various modalities of active learning and hone their team-work skills, master content related to hearts and lungs, continue their exploration of digital anatomy, and strengthen relationships with peers and academic mentors. The course provides basic concepts in normal anatomy, physiology, pathophysiology, clinical diagnosis, and therapeutics of the cardiovascular and respiratory systems. Content includes structures, processes and diseases of the coronary and peripheral vasculature, cardiac muscle, conduction system, cardiac valves, and pericardium; mechanism and significance of abnormal findings on cardiovascular and respiratory exams; role of the cardiovascular systems in regulation of blood pressure; approach to a broad spectrum of respiratory disease categories and diagnosis and treatment of respiratory failure; interpretation of laboratory findings to identify and manage common acid- base disturbances; vascular and interstitial diseases. The block includes laboratory instruction (anatomy, histology and simulation center activities that emphasize correlations with clinical cases). Course content focuses on the following learning objectives and competencies:

1. Understand the principles of basic and clinical sciences related to the structure and function of the cardiovascular, respiratory, and renal systems, including common congenital abnormalities. (MK1)

2. Correlate basic normal and pathological anatomy with radiologic imaging methods of the heart, vasculature, airways, lungs, kidneys, and urinary system utilizing ultrasound, X- ray, CT, MRI, angiography, endoscopy, and other imaging modalities. (MK1, MK2, MK3)

3. Understand the underlying causes of common diseases of the cardiovascular, respiratory, and renal systems including their epidemiology, prevention, detection, and evidence-based treatment. (MK2, MK3, MK4, MK5, MK6)

4. Develop a systematic approach to the pharmacological management of disorders of the cardiovascular, respiratory, and renal systems including indications and contraindications, mechanism of action, drug – drug interactions and common unintended effects. (MK4)

5. Characterize the non-pharmacologic management and prevention of cardiovascular, respiratory, and renal disease. (MK3, MK6)

6. Understand the principles of interpretation of an electrocardiogram and recognize common arrhythmias. (MK1, MK3, MK4)

7. Understand the relationship between the cardiovascular and renal systems in the control of blood pressure and the therapeutic management of hypotension and hypertension. (MK2, MK3, MK4)

8. Understand the physiology and pathophysiology of lung mechanics and gas exchange. (MK2, MK3)

9. Demonstrate an understanding of the tests used to evaluate lung function and gas exchange and the interpretation of these data. (MK3)

10. Recognize the characteristic differences in the physical findings, imaging, and management in patients with restrictive, obstructive, interstitial, and infectious lung disease. (MK2, MK3, MK4)

11. Characterize the different types of respiratory infections and formulate the appropriate antibiotic regimen for each entity. (MK2, MK3, MK4, MK6, MK7)

12. Differentiate the pathologic types of lung cancer, risk factors, presenting symptoms, diagnostic strategies, staging and treatment options. (MK2, MK3, MK4)

13. Understand the relationship between the anatomy and physiology of the kidney, and how the kidney serves to function in electrolyte, fluid, and acid – base regulation and the associated common disorders. (MK1, MK2, MK3)

14. Recognize the pathogenesis of tubulointerstitial and glomerular disease, methods of diagnosis, their clinical impact, and the role of infection, congenital abnormalities, and immune disorders in the genesis of these diseases. (MK1, MK2, MK3)

15. Describe the role of dialysis in the management of acute and chronic renal failure. (MK4)

16. Describe the indications, mechanism of action, effects, and side effects of diuretic drugs. (MK4)

17.Identify the causes, diagnostic procedures and treatment of urinary tract infections, obstruction of the urinary collection system and tumors of the upper and lower urinary tract. (MK2, MK3, MK4)

18. Understand the integrated roles of the cardiovascular, respiratory, and renal systems in maintaining acid-base homeostasis and apply this knowledge to the management of common acid-base derangements. (MK1, MK2, MK3, MK4)

19. Demonstrate the ability to independently search the literature, assess the quality of resources, and apply evidence- based principles to clinical decision making. (MK5, PBLI2, PBLI3)

20. Demonstrate the ability to synthesize information from multiple sources and provide concise presentations. (PBLI2, PBLI3, ICS5)

21. Develop the ability to work effectively as part of a team with effective communication, leadership, life-long learning, and problem-solving skills, and become skilled at self- assessment as well as assessing the performance of peers and faculty. (PBLI1, ICS1, ICS5, P2)

22. In the context of ethical principles, social justice, and optimum patient-centered care, define, describe, and recognize issues related to diversity, equity, and inclusion relevant to population health and disease processes presented in this course. (SBP1, SBP3, ICS2, ICS3, P1, P2)

MDC 6012 PATIENT CENTERED CARE 2

During this course students recognize common health issues and risks, understanding the signs of cardiac distress, and learn to respond to patients’ emotions. Course content focuses on the following learning objectives:

1. Recognize the importance of addressing common health issues and risks even when they are not the presenting problem, in non-emergent evaluations of patients with cardiac, respiratory, or renal conditions. (PCPS5)

2. Understand the signs of a patient in distress due to disease states in cardiac, respiratory, or renal organ systems (PCPS3, PCPS4)

3. Conduct respectful and empathic oral communication with patients and their families (PCPS1, ICS2, ICS3, ICS4, ICS5, P1, P2)

4. Respond appropriately to patient’s emotions and demonstrates empathy during the encounter. (PCPS5)

5. Begin to provide a summary statement, either written or verbal, of patient’s presenting complaint, HPI and problem list. (PCPS7, ICS1)

6. Demonstrate the ability to recognize normal and abnormal heart sounds via auscultation on a simulated patient. (MK1, MK3, PCPS2)

7. Demonstrate the ability to recognize and manage common, basic cardiovascular emergencies on a simulated patient. (MK1, MK3, PCPS2, PCPS3, PCPS4)

8. In the context of ethical principles, social justice, and optimum patient-centered care, define, describe, and recognize issues related to diversity, equity, and inclusion relevant to population health and disease processes presented in this course. (SBP1, SBP3, ICS2, ICS3, P1, P2)

MDF 6003 HEMATOLOGIC, GASTROINTESTINAL, NUTRITION AND ENDOCRINE

During this course students master forming and working in teams (utilizing active learning) and continue to integrate content specific to Hematologic, Gastrointestinal and Nutrition and Endocrine systems. The exploration of digital anatomy continues as does the strengthening of relationships with peers and academic mentors. The course provides basic concepts in normal anatomy, physiology, pathophysiology, clinical diagnosis, and therapeutics of the hematologic, endocrine, and gastrointestinal and hepatic systems and human nutrition, including normal nutrition and diagnosis and managements of common nutritional disorders. The block includes laboratory instruction (anatomy, histology, and simulation center activities); TBL cases provide the fundamental knowledge of common gastrointestinal and hepatic disorders (including nutritional implications where appropriate) and are complemented by lectures for specific diseases. The simulation component emphasizes correlations with clinical cases and localization of digestive system lesions. Course content focuses on the following learning objectives:

1. Identify the normal components of blood and the laboratory methods used to assess them. (MK1, PCPS4)

2. Develop a coherent approach to the evaluation of anemia and classify anemic patients based on clinical and laboratory evaluation. (MK2, MK3)

3. Differentiate the major hematopoietic and lymphoid tissues based on their structure and function and identify commonly associated pathologies. (MK1, MK2, MK3)

4. Compare the characteristic pathologic and clinical features of the most common lymphoid and myeloid neoplasms and the clinically important molecular genetics of each. (MK2, MK3, MK4)

5. Categorize the most common immune-mediated hematologic disorders based upon their immunologic features and diagnostic tests. (MK2, MK3)

6. Identify commonly encountered pathogens that produce hematologic manifestations or direct infection of hematopoietic or lymphoid tissues and the clinical manifestations of infection. (MK2, MK3)

7. Distinguish among the mechanisms of action, clinical applications, pharmacokinetics, toxicities, and interactions of drugs used for anemia, hematologic malignancies, and coagulation disorders. (MK4)

8. Schematize the mechanisms that initiate, and limit blood clot formation and the lab tests used to monitor coagulation disorders. (MK1, MK2, MK3)

9. Understand how blood is typed and cross-matched and identify the risks associated with the transfusion of blood and blood components. (MK1, MK2, MK3, MK4)

10. Understand the principles of the basic and clinical sciences related to the structures, processes and diseases of the esophagus, stomach, small and large intestines, gallbladder, liver, and pancreas. (MK1, MK2)

11. Explain normal GI physiology, its relation to nutrition (including nutrient digestion and absorption), and the interaction of GI function and nutritional status. (MK1, MK2)

12. Describe energy metabolism from the level of basic biochemical pathways to whole body energy balance and the impact of imbalance on health. (MK1, MK6, MK7)

13. Describe macronutrients and micronutrients required for human health across the life cycle and the impact of deficiencies and excesses on health. (MK2, MK3)

14. Apply principles and methods of nutrition assessment and analysis of diet and exercise records. (PCPS4, ICS2)

15. Understand the indications for enteral and parenteral nutrition support, the potential delivery sites for each type of support, and potential complications and contraindications. (MK3, MK4)

16. Correlate normal and pathologic anatomy of the gastrointestinal tract with images generated by radiographs, CT and MRI scanning, ultrasound, endoscopic visualization of the digestive system, and other imaging techniques. (MK1, MK3)

17.Describe the basic pathologic processes of common acute and chronic diseases of the hollow and solid organs of the gastrointestinal tract – upper and lower GI, biliary system and gallbladder, and liver. (MK3, PCPS4)

18. Understand basic concepts of the physiology, pathology, epidemiology, and clinical management of disorders of the endocrine system. (MK1, MK2, MK4, MK6)

19. Identify the glands, organs, tissues, and cells that synthesize and secrete hormones, hormone precursors, and associated compounds. (MK1)

20. Demonstrate a basic understanding of the structure and mechanisms of action of homeostatic hormones, as well as the principles of control and regulation of hormone synthesis and release. (MK1)

21. Synthesize the principles and practice of pharmacological and non-pharmacological interventions in the prevention and management of common hematologic, nutritional, gastrointestinal, and endocrine, hematologic disorders. (MK4)

22. Apply basic concepts of differential diagnosis, pathophysiology, and management to clinical scenarios of patients with different forms hematologic, nutritional, gastrointestinal, and endocrine disorders. (MK2, MK4, PCPS3, ICS1)

23. Demonstrate the ability to independently search the literature, assess the quality of resources, and apply principles of evidence-based medicine to clinical decision making. (MK5, PBLI2, PBLI3)

24. Demonstrate ability to synthesize information from multiple sources and provide concise presentations. (PBLI2, PBLI3, ICS5)

25. Demonstrate the ability to work effectively as part of a team, with effective communication, leadership, life-long learning, and problem-solving skills, and skill in self- assessment as well as assessing the performance of peers and faculty. (PBLI1, ICS1, ICS5, P2)

26. In the context of ethical principles, social justice, and optimum patient-centered care, define, describe, and recognize issues related to diversity, equity, and inclusion relevant to population health and disease processes presented in this course. (SBP1, SBP3, ICS2, ICS3, P1, P2)

MDC 6013 PATIENT CENTERED CARE 3

During this course students recognize common health issues and risks; conduct clinical presentations in group settings; reflect on internal motivations and expectations for the medical profession; demonstrate compassion, honesty, integrity, respect, responsibility, and self- discipline in relationship with all individuals, regardless of gender, age, culture, race, religion, sexual orientation, disability, or socioeconomic status. Students also practice prioritizing patient’s preferences, comfort, safety, and autonomy in every clinical encounter. Course content focuses on the following learning objectives:

1. Understand the role of consultants in contributing to the care of patients and the need to formulate a clear clinical question to be addressed. (ICS1, ICS3, ICS5)

2. Conduct clinical presentations in group settings. (ICS5)

3. Understand the different and contributing roles of the health care team and recognize the communication strategies that help reduce medical errors. (ICS2, ICS3, ICS4, ICS5, SBP2, PBLI4)

4. Reflect on internal motivations and expectations for the medical profession. (ICS1, P1, PBLI4)

5. Behave in a professional manner by demonstrating compassion, honesty, integrity, respect, responsibility, and self-discipline in relationships with all individuals, regardless of gender, age, culture, race, ethnicity, religion, sexual orientation, disability, socioeconomic status, native language, or role. (P2)

6. Prioritize patient’s preferences, comfort, safety, and autonomy in every clinical setting and scenario. (ICS2, ICS4, P1, P5)

7. In the context of ethical principles, social justice, and optimum patient-centered care, define, describe, and recognize issues related to diversity, equity, and inclusion relevant to population health and disease processes presented in this course. (SBP1, SBP3, ICS2, ICS3, P1, P2) 

MDF 6004 REPRODUCTIVE, BRAIN, BEHAVIOR, AND INTEGUMENT

The reproductive portion of the course covers basic concepts and vocabulary of male and female biology as it relates to pathology, gynecological diseases, and infertility. The human life cycle, focusing on infancy to geriatrics is included in reproductive. The course includes simulated clinical experiences. Students continue to integrate course material related to neuroscience, behavioral medicine, endocrinology, and biostatistics into their knowledge of the human body using team-based learning methodologies and digital anatomy. Relationships with peers and academic mentors continue to strengthen. The brain and behavior aspect of the course addresses basic concepts of normal and abnormal behavior, common psychiatric diseases including clinical diagnosis, therapeutics, and psychopharmacology, and sessions focusing on disease prevention and wellness at each stage of the lifecycle including the role of behavior in prevention. Course content focuses on the following learning objectives:

1. Understand basic concepts of the physiology, pathology, epidemiology, and clinical management of disorders of the reproductive system. (MK1, MK2, MK4, MK6)

2. Describe the physiology of normal pregnancy, labor and delivery, and issues in family planning/contraception. (MK1, MK4, MK7)

3. Explain signs, symptoms, and diagnosis of common disorders for the male and female reproductive systems, including benign and malignant neoplasms, infections, menstrual disorders, sexual dysfunction, disorders of sexual differentiation, abnormal pregnancy, infertility, pubertal disorders, and urinary tract (including prostate) disorders. (MK2, MK3)

4. Relate the anatomical, physiological, and neurochemical features of the brain, brainstem, spinal cord, and cranial and peripheral nerves to both normal and pathologic functions, behaviors, and clinical signs and symptoms. (MK1, MK2, MK3)

5. Describe the embryologic origins of the nervous system and recognize clinically significant errors in neuroembryological development. (MK1, MK2, MK3)

6. Describe the anatomy and function of the meninges, and the origins and flow of cerebrospinal fluid under both normal and pathological conditions. (MK1, MK2)

7. Use an understanding of functional neuroanatomy to localize nervous system lesions based on clinical findings. (MK1, MK2, MK3)

8. Identify the various causes of nervous system damage or dysfunction, the response to injury over time, and to make accurate predictions regarding clinical course and patient prognosis. (MK2, MK3, PCPS4)

9. Illustrate how disruptions in the blood supply to the brain, brainstem and spinal cord lead to nervous system dysfunction and disease. (MK1, MK2, MK3)

10. Demonstrate the ability to develop a prioritized differential diagnosis based on the patient history, neurologic exam, diagnostic testing, and mechanism of injury. (MK3, PCPS2, PCPS3)

11. Propose rational management for diseases of the central nervous system, peripheral nervous system, and psychiatric disorders using evidence-based medicine, including the mechanisms of pharmacologic and non- pharmacologic therapies. (MK4, MK5, PCPS4)

12. Understand how biological and non-biological factors interact in normal behavior and psychopathology across the life cycle including the influence of cognitive, affective, ego and defense mechanisms on reasoning, social development, and emotional development. (MK1, MK2, MK7)

13. Identify the distinguishing features and behaviors relating to different psychiatric disorders including mood disorders, personality disorders, dissociative disorders, psychotic disorders, and cognitive behavioral disorders. (MK1, MK2, MK7)

14. Analyze the interactions of psychology, sociology, biology, and pharmacology in addiction and how to screen and treat patients living with substance addiction and abuse. (MK1, MK2, MK7)

15. Recognize effective strategies for communicating sensitive information to patients and families including those related to culture, sexuality, gender, abuse, death, and grieving. (PCPS2, PCPS3, P1, P2, P4, MK7)

16. Appraise the ethical implications, legal implications, and responsibilities related to the care of susceptible populations including pediatric, geriatric, and mentally ill populations. (MK4, MK7, PCPS1, P1, P2, P3, P4, P5)

17.Evaluate genetic factors in neurocognitive disorders and possible influences of gene therapy on prevalence and management. (MK2, MK3, MK4, MK6)

18. Analyze the biopsychosocial effects of illness on patients and caretakers and propose interventions to address these effects. (MK7, PCPS4, PCPS5)

19. Perform developmentally and age-appropriate risk assessment, screening, and anticipatory guidance over the life cycle. (MK3, MK4, PCPS1)

20. Explain the processes of learning and memory including the neuroanatomical pathways involved. (MK1)

21. Interpret the stages of sleep, causes of sleep disorders, and changes in the sleep cycle with relation to aging. (MK1, MK2)

22. Demonstrate the ability to work effectively as part of a team with effective communication, leadership, life- long learning, and problem-solving skills, and become skilled at self-assessments as well as assessing the performance of peers and faculty (PBLI1, ICS1, ICS5, P2)

23. Discuss the structure and function of the integumentary system including common related clinical conditions and their pathophysiology. (MK1, MK2, MK3)

24. In the context of ethical principles, social justice, and optimum patient-centered care, define, describe, and recognize issues related to diversity, equity, and inclusion relevant to population health and disease processes presented in this course. (SBP1, SBP3, ICS2, ICS3, P1, P2)

MDC 6014 PATIENT CENTERED CARE 4

During this course students recognize common health issues and risks; build professional relationships and maintain mutual respect during all interactions, document a clearly elaborated chief complaint, history, and physical exam in a patient progress note; perform a physical examination; propose the most likely diagnosis based on chief complaint, history, and physical exam; generate a problem list; and predict the most likely clinical findings based on the differential. Students learn male and female GU exams using medical models with standardized patients during the concurrent clinical course. Course content focuses on the following learning objectives:

1. Build professional relationships and maintain mutual respect during all inter-professional interactions (ICS1, SBP2)

2. Conduct all inter-personal interactions with respect, inclusive of diversity, empathy, and honesty while adhering to the ethical principles inherent to the medical profession (SBP1)

3. Document a clearly elaborated chief complaint, history, and physical exam in a patient progress note. (ICS5)

4. Conduct both a comprehensive and appropriately targeted adolescent, adult and geriatric medical history that denotes consideration for clinical setting and patient acuity. (PCPS1, PCPS2)

5. Perform a physical examination guided by the principles of hypothesis driven examination and articulating expected and actual normal and abnormal findings in an accurate and sensitive manner. (PCPS1, PCPS2)

6. Propose the most likely diagnosis based on chief complaint, history, and physical exam. (PCPS3)

7. Generate a problem list from a real or simulated patient. (PCPS4)

8. Predict the most likely clinical findings based on the differential. (MK2, PCPS4)

9. In the context of ethical principles, social justice, and optimum patient-centered care, define, describe, and recognize issues related to diversity, equity, and inclusion relevant to population health and disease processes presented in this course. (SBP1, SBP3, ICS2, ICS3, P1, P2)

MDF 6005 FOUNDATIONAL AND CLINICAL INTEGRATION

With the completion of the systems sequence, students review the integration of all systems and prepare to take United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE) Step 1.

MDC 6015 ADVANCED CLINICAL SKILLS AND DIAGNOSTIC MEDICINE

During this course students recognize landmarks on routine radiographic imaging and begin to identify best diagnostic imaging to confirm diagnoses on the differential; articulate a basic management plan that considers risk, benefits, and patient preferences; and identifies patient risk factors related to lifestyle. Students also provide a focused summary of the patient’s most clinically relevant findings and articulates a clinical question to be answered by a consultant. Students define culture competence, identify social determinants of health in simulated patient encounters as appropriate, and reflect on how personal and social bias may contribute to health disparities. Course content focuses on the following learning objectives:

1. Recognize anatomical landmarks on routine radiographic imaging as well as begin to identify best diagnostic imaging to confirm diagnoses on the differential. (PCPS4)

2. Begin to articulate a basic management plan, considering risk and benefits and incorporating patient preferences. (PCPS4, SBP7)

3. Identify patient risk factors related to their lifestyles and underlying condition. (PCPS5, MK7)

4. Elaborate a clinical question, researches the medical literature, identifies a recent (within 5 years) medical article, and completes an analytical worksheet for one simulated 5. vignette. (PCPS4, PBLI1, PBLI2, PBLI3)

5. Recognize the signs of a patient in distress, recognizes need for help and initiates BLS. (PCPS3, PCPS4)

6. Conduct respectful and empathic oral communication with patients and their families, demonstrating awareness of patient-centered principles, in a variety of settings and situations. (PCPS1, ICS2, ICS3, ICS4, ICS5, P1, P2)

7. Provide education, when prompted, responds appropriately to patient’s emotions, and demonstrates empathy during the encounter. (PCPS1, PCPS5, ICS2, ICS3, ICS4)

8. Elaborate a more concise and organized summary statement of patient’s presenting complaint, HPI and problem list. (PCPS7, ICS1)

9. Provide a focused summary of patient’s most clinically relevant findings and articulate a clinical question to be answered by a consultant. (ICS1, ICS5, ICS3)

10. Present a complete, formal case presentation to community preceptors. (ICS5)

11. Identify the different and contributing roles of the health care team and recognize the communication strategies that help reduce medical errors. (ICS2, ICS3, ICS4, ICS5, SBP2, PBLI4)

12. Observe common clinical procedures using simulation and understands the importance of informed consent in preparing for a procedure. (ICS6, P4)

13. Recognize personal sources of bias and how these may impact quality of care. (PCPS1, P1, MK7)

14. Behave in a professional manner by demonstrating compassion, honesty, integrity, respect, responsibility, and self-discipline in relationships with all individuals, regardless of gender, age, culture, race, ethnicity, religion, sexual orientation, disability, socioeconomic status, native language, or role. (P2)

15. Prioritize patient’s preferences, comfort, safety, and autonomy in every clinical encounter. (P1, ICS2, ICS3, ICS4)

16. Build professional relationships by working inter-professionally on a service-learning project. (ICS1, SBP4)

17.Conduct all inter-personal interactions with respect, inclusive of diversity, empathy, and honesty while adhering to the ethical principles inherent to the medical profession. (SBP1)

18. Recognize the prevalence of medical errors, identify factors which contribute to these errors, as well as understand strategies that are in place to improve patient safety. (SBP4, SBP5, PBLI4)

19. Document a complete progress note using the P-SOAP format for 2 patient encounters. (ICS5)

20. Define cultural competence, identify social determinants of health in simulated patient encounters as appropriate, and reflect on how personal and social bias may contribute to health disparities. (SBP3, SBP5, PBLI4)

21. In the context of ethical principles, social justice, and optimum patient-centered care, define, describe, and recognize issues related to diversity, equity, and inclusion relevant to population health and disease processes presented in this course. (SBP1, SBP3, ICS2, ICS3, P1, P2)

MDFC 7100 FAMILY MEDICINE CLERKSHIP (6 WEEKS)

Prerequisite: Pass all foundational science blocks and courses and USMLE Step 1. The clerkship assigns students to clinical experiences in the offices of primary care providers coupled with inpatient experiences for patients from the provider’s practice. The goal of this clerkship is for students to build their own panel of patients, develop a relationship over time, and follow patients to different clinical experiences that are part of their medical care. Provides opportunity for students to gain basic knowledge in every aspect of primary care medicine.

MDIC 7200 INTERNAL MEDICINE CLERKSHIP (12 WEEKS)

Prerequisite: Pass all foundational science blocks and courses and USMLE Step 1. Students develop a comprehensive approach to the evaluation and care of the adult medical patient, focusing on improving their ability to obtain, record, analyze and communicate clinical information. Includes both inpatient experience as a member of resident team and outpatient clinics. Each student gains an awareness of the knowledge, skills, values and attitudes that internists strive to acquire and maintain throughout their professional lives. Students have supervised responsibility for patient care, learning to integrate clinical knowledge with practical experience.

MDGC 7300 OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOLOGY CLERKSHIP (6 WEEKS)

Prerequisite: Pass all foundational science blocks and courses and USMLE Step 1. The clerkships include an in-patient labor and delivery experience, an inpatient gynecologic surgery experience, an outpatient preceptor-based experience (including sessions in an outpatient ob/gyn office), and a subspecialty experience (e.g., reproductive endocrinologist, maternal-fetal specialist, uro-gynecologist, gynecologic oncologist). Provides opportunity for students to observe and gain basic knowledge in the care of both obstetrics and gynecology patients in inpatient and outpatient settings. Under supervision by teaching faculty, students are involved in every aspect of the patient’s care.

MDPC 7400 PEDIATRICS CLERKSHIP (6 WEEKS)

Prerequisite: Pass all foundational science blocks and courses and USMLE Step 1. Provides medical students with the knowledge and clinical experience necessary to develop basic skills in the evaluation and management of health and disease in infants, children and adolescents. The clerkship provides experiences in the outpatient and inpatient settings, emphasizing those aspects of pediatrics that should be understood and mastered by all physicians, regardless of ultimate career goals.

MDYC 7500 PSYCHIATRY CLERKSHIP (6 WEEKS)

Prerequisite: Pass all foundational science blocks and courses and USMLE Step 1. This clerkship involves a four-week inpatient experience and a two-week integrated outpatient/subspecialty experience. Designed to help students develop clinical skills and a knowledge base in psychiatry. This clerkship includes inpatient, outpatient, consultation-liaison, substance abuse, and experience in a psychiatric emergency room.

MDSC 7600 SURGERY CLERKSHIP (12 WEEKS)

Prerequisite: Pass all foundational science blocks and courses and USMLE Step 1. This is an intense clinical experience that introduces students to the basic principles of surgery, with an inpatient experience as a member of resident team, an experience in surgical subspecialties (e.g., anesthesia, plastics, ENT, etc.) and outpatient clinics to learn about pre-operative and post-operative care. Equips students with the knowledge and skills relevant to surgical management that all physicians should possess. Aims to emphasize patient responsibility and professional behavior as essential qualities for new physicians to develop.

2021-2022

ACADEMIC CATALOG

The academic catalog describes the educational program and activities available at WAUSM. WAUSM’s curriculum is designed to build a solid foundation and positions students for success.

2021-2022

STUDENT HANDBOOK

The information contained in the student handbook serves as a guide for students throughout their academic, clinical,  and extracurricular life as members of the WAUSM community.

OFFICE OF THE UNIVERSITY

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